CRWR Online Reports

Permanent URI for this collection

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 20 of 153
  • Item
    Photographic field reconnaissance of bayous between Green Lake and Mission Lake in the Guadalupe River Estuary
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Hodges, Ben R.
  • Item
    A Mexican case study for world water online
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Espinoza Dávalos, Gonzalo Enrique
  • Item
    Bathymetric survey of Imja Lake, Nepal in 2012
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Somos-Valenzuela, Marcelo; McKinney, Daene C.; Byers, Alton C.; Rounce, David R.
    Imja Lake is one of the most studied lakes in the Himalaya as well as one of the most rapidly evolving glacial lakes in Nepal. Many researchers have studied the lake and the potential of a glacier lake outburst flood from the lake. One of the important factors in assessing the outburst flood risk is the volume that could be released in the flood and good bathymetric data is necessary to estimate that value. This work reports on the 2012 bathymetric survey of Imja Lake and the rate of expansion that has been observed in the lake over the last two decades, since 1992. The survey was somewhat hampered by the extensive iceberg coverage of the lake in September 2012, but a good estimate of the bottom bathymetry and the current volume was obtained. When compared to previous surveys, it is very clear that the lake bottom has continued to deepen as the ice beneath the lake has melted. The average depth has increased by 62% since 2002 and continues to increase at a rate of 1.8 m/yr. The maximum depth has increased 28% since 2002 and is increasing currently at a rate of 5.8 m/yr. Perhaps more important in terms of glacier lake outburst flood risk is the continued rapid areal expansion of the lake which has expanded 41% since 2002 and is growing at a rate of 0.02 km2/yr. This expansion has resulted in an additional 6 million m3 of water for an outburst flood event, and increasing the maximum possible flood volume to 36.3 million m3 a 73% increase from what was calculated using 2002 data.
  • Item
    The long tail of hydroinformatics: Implementing biological and oceanographic information in hydrologic information systems
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Hersh, Eric S.
    Hydrologic Information Systems (HIS) have emerged as a means to organize, share, and synthesize water data. This work extends current HIS capabilities by providing additional capacity and flexibility for marine physical and chemical observations data and for freshwater and marine biological observations data. These goals are accomplished in two broad and disparate case studies–an HIS implementation for the oceanographic domain as applied to the offshore environment of the Chukchi Sea, a region of the Alaskan Arctic, and a separate HIS implementation for the aquatic biology and environmental flows domains as applied to Texas rivers. These case studies led to the development of a new four-dimensional data cube to accommodate biological observations data with axes of space, time, species, and trait, a new data model for biological observations, an expanded ontology and data dictionary for biological taxa and traits, and an expanded chain-of-custody approach for improved data source tracking. A large number of small studies across a wide range of disciplines comprise the “Long Tail” of science. This work builds upon the successes of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) by applying HIS technologies to two new Long Tail disciplines: aquatic biology and oceanography. In this regard this research improves our understanding of how to deal with collections of biological data stored alongside sensor-based physical data. Based on the results of these case studies, a common framework for water information management for terrestrial and marine systems has emerged which consists of Hydrologic Information Systems for observations data, Geographic Information Systems for geographic data, and Digital Libraries for documents and other digital assets. It is envisioned that the next generation of HIS will be comprised of these three components and will thus actually be a Water Information System of Systems.
  • Item
    Soil moisture mapping of drought in Texas
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Sullivan, Johnny; Maidment, David R.
  • Item
    Ground penetrating radar survey for risk reduction at Imja Lake, Nepal
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Somos-Valenzuela, Marcelo; McKinney, Daene C.; Byers, Alton C.; Voss, Katalyn; Moss, Jefferson; McKinney, James C.
  • Item
    Reducing turbidity of construction site runoff via coagulation with polyacrylamide and chitosan
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Rounce, David Robert; Lawler, Desmond F.; Barrett, Michael E.
    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is in the process of developing a nationwide standard for turbidity in construction site runoff. It is widely expected that this standard cannot be met with conventional erosion and sediment control measures; consequently, innovative practices for managing sediment on construction sites must be developed. The objective of this research was to develop an understanding of how soil characteristics and polymer properties affect the amount of turbidity reduction that can be achieved through flocculation. The polymers used were PAMs, a proprietary product, and chitosan. The charge density of the PAMs ranged from 0% to 50% and the molecular weights ranged from 0.2 to 14 Mg/mol. A protocol for creating modified synthetic stormwater runoff for soil samples was developed and used on soils from seven construction sites. Particle size distributions were used to compare the modified synthetic stormwater runoff with grab samples of stormwater from one site and showed the synthetic runoff was representative of the actual runoff. Flocculation tests were performed on the synthetic runoffs with PAM and chitosan doses from 0.03 to 10 mg/L. The non-ionic PAM, proprietary product, and chitosan were found to be the most effective at reducing the turbidity of all the synthetic runoff below 200 NTU. The high molecular weight anionic PAMs were effective on only two of the seven synthetic runoff samples. Hardness tests were performed indicating interparticle bridging to be the bonding mechanism of the PAM. Electrophoretic mobility tests were performed on two of the soil suspensions and indicated the bonding mechanism of PAM to be interparticle bridging, and the bonding mechanism of chitosan to be a combination of charge neutralization and interparticle bridging. Tests showed as the charge density of the PAM increased, their effectiveness decreased.
  • Item
    A Python wrapper for coupling hydrodynamic and oil spill models
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Rosenzweig, Itay; Hodges, Ben R.
  • Item
    User's guide to the Nueces Delta hydrodynamic model v1.0
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Ryan, Andrea J.; Hodges, Ben R.
  • Item
    Modeling hydrodynamic fluxes in the Nueces River Delta
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Ryan, Andrea J.; Hodges, Ben R.
  • Item
    A hydrologic information system for water availability modeling
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Siler, Clark
  • Item
    Hydropower site study at Imja Lake and Dingboche Village
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Allard, Jason; McKinney, Daene C.
  • Item
    Hydrologic modeling of the Pecos River Basin below Red Bluff Reservoir
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Yalçinkaya, Sedat; McKinney, Daene C.
  • Item
    Modeling climate change impacts on hydrology and water resources: Case study Rio Conchos basin
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Ingol-Blanco, Eusebio Mercedes; McKinney, Daene C.
  • Item
    Water planning and management for large scale river basins: Case of study of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo transboundary basin
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-03-15) Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; McKinney, Daene C.
  • Item
    Evaluating water resource management in transboundary river basins using cooperative game theory: The Rio Grande/Bravo basin
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2011-04-14) Teasley, Rebecca L.; McKinney, Daene C.
  • Item
    Performance comparison of stormwater biofiltration designs
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2011-04-14) Limouzin, Maëlle; Lawler, Desmond F.; Barrett, Michael E.
    A biofiltration system is a stormwater Best Management Practice (BMP) that uses a biologically active filtration bed to remove contaminants. This type of BMP is preferred because it provides the opportunity for pollutant uptake (particularly nutrients) by vegetation in an aesthetically pleasing design. The goals of this research, proposed by the City of Austin, Texas, are to assess the role of plants in nutrient removal and to compare the pollutant removal effectiveness of biofiltration systems containing different media, plant species and designs. A laboratory column study was conducted with nineteen experiments using synthetic stormwater and one experiment using real stormwater. The results of this study show a significant improvement in nutrient removal with the presence of plants and a submerged zone with a carbon source in the filter. The columns without plants were found to export up to twice the nitrate/nitrite input, whereas the columns with plants showed significant removal of all nutrients (Nitrate 30-50%, Total Kjeldhal Nitrogen 65-85%, Total Phosphorus 80-90%). The difference between the two biofiltration media was not significant. Metals (Copper, Lead, Zinc) removal by all columns was very high (>95%) compared to similar field studies. Total Suspended Solids removal remained high through the whole set of experiments for all the columns (85- 95%).
  • Item
    Hydraulic performance of temporary construction traffic barriers
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2011-04-14) Hudson, Cody Brent; Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.
  • Item
    Drainage hydraulics of porous pavement: Coupling surface and subsurface flow
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2011-04-14) Eck, Bradley J.; Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.
  • Item
    Hydrologic analysis before and after reservoir alteration at the Big Bend reach, Rio Grande/Rio Bravo
    (Center for Research in Water Resources, University of Texas at Austin, 2011-04-14) Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; Reith, Benjamin; McKinney, Daene C.